Mimes: Curated by Christopher Marinos

Marcel Broodthaers, Antonis Donef, Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub, Nikos Kanarelis, Apostolos Karastergiou, Nina Papaconstantinou, Ilias Papailiakis, Florian Pumhösl, Batia Suter, The Infinite Library (Daniel Gustav Cramer & Haris Epaminonda), Panos Tsagaris

14 May - 27 June, 2009

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  ABOUT THE EXHIBITION
 
Marcel Broodthaers, Antonis Donef, Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub, Nikos Kanarelis, Apostolos Karastergiou, Nina Papaconstantinou, Ilias Papailiakis, Florian Pumhösl, Batia Suter, The Infinite Library (Daniel Gustav Cramer & Haris Epaminonda), Panos Tsagaris

The exhibition “Mimes” focuses on the use of citations by contemporary artists and consists of works  that have an encyclopedic character. The title of the show is borrowed from the well-known book by the “writer of writers”, Marcel Schwob.
 
Observing the works of a large number of contemporary artists, one becomes aware of a strong interest in the use of citations. Their arsenal of references seems more inexhaustible than ever: whether it refers to classical works of modern art, architecture, design and music or to post-modern revisions, everything is available for “downloading” and being handled in new ways.
 
The exhibition is based on the famous artistĘs book Un Coup de Dés Jamais nĘ'bolira le Hasard (A Throw of the Dice will Never Abolish Chance) by the Belgian artist Marcel Broodthaers, published in Antwerp in 1969. Broodthaer's publication is a faithful copy of the poem with the same title by the Symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé, with the difference that the text has been replaced by black lines. This rare artist's book not only uncovers the timely character of thought of a “former poet” such as Broodthaers but also the immense influence that Mallarmé exerted on art after Duchamp.
 
The works in the exhibition refer more to palimpsests thus revealing in the best way the post-literary positions of Schwob (“nothing is new in this world aside from form”) but also of Mallarmé (“the world is made in order to end up as a beautiful book”).